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Sell your car faster

Thank you for choosing full Gold Package with us.

Please email us your photos and your advert will be live within 24 hours.

Email: info@testcars.co.uk

Include:

  • Photos
  • Price
  • Registration number
  • Mileage
  • Contact telephone or preffered email
  • Postcode or location
  • Description if you have one already or any specifications

Or Email us your link to advert so we can copy directly from your existing advert.

Any questions please contact us on 07561404046 or info@testcars.co.uk

GUIDE HOW TO SELL YOUR CAR

Easy 7 steps

 

1. Preparing your car for sale

Preparing your car for sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing your car properly can make a used car look new, adding hundreds of pounds to its value.

Car maintenance checks

Most car buyers will check under the bonnet when viewing a car. Remember to:
• Check the oil level and top it up if needed – information on this will be included in the car’s handbook
• Fill all water and coolant vessels – again, check the handbook
• Check tyre pressures and replace any worn or damaged tyres
• Repair damage to trim if possible

Washing your car

Spending a few hours cleaning your car could add hundreds to the car’s value by giving it a cared-for look. You could hire a professional valeting service, but washing your car yourself will be much cheaper.

Give the bodywork a wash and remove watermarks with a chamois leather cloth. Alloy wheel cleaner helps remove stubborn dirt from wheels and it’s a good idea to replace damaged wheel trims.

Clean the interior

A clean interior is as important as sparkling bodywork. Make sure you:
• Vacuum the carpets, mats and seats
• Empty the ash trays
• Remove rubbish from the boot and glovebox
• Wipe the dashboard and trim panels with a damp cloth
• Clean glass with a window cleaner and damp chamois

The paperwork

Buyers will want to see the car’s history, so gather it all together and put it in a folder, removing any credit card receipts. Don’t forget to include:
• The V5C registration document (logbook)
• Service history – receipts and service book
• MOT certificates
• Warranty documents
• The car’s handbook

The final step is to gather your car’s documents. Most car buyers will expect to be able to see the VSC registration document (logbook), service log, MOT certificates, any warranty documents and the car’s handbook.

2. Taking great photos

Taking great photos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos sell cars, so it’s important to get some good shots of your car looking its best. We show you how.

The first step is to clean your car thoroughly.

Make sure you keep the camera steady, checking the camera’s focus is sharp and not blurred – most cameras have an automatic setting for this.

Avoid:

• Parking with an unsightly background
• Taking photographs in dull, overcast weather or at night
• Taking pictures from above or too low down
• Artificial light and direct sunlight
• Cutting part of the car off, unless you’re photographing details

Where?

• Park your car somewhere bright and spacious if possible – a clean driveway is ideal
• Leave plenty of room for you to walk around the vehicle and take pictures from different angles
• Remove any distractions such as luggage and rubbish
• Make sure the car is well lit but not too bright

What to photograph?

• Front corner
• Rear corner
• Front straight-on
• Back straight-on
• Side profile
• Close-up of a wheel – especially if they are alloys
• The dashboard
• Front and rear seats
• Inside the boot
• The engine bay
• Any damage to your car
• If your car’s a convertible, take a picture with the roof down and another with the roof up

Remember to take more than one picture of each area to give you choice later on. Try to keep the whole car in the image.

Uploading your photos

Choose the nine best photos and decide on the main image – an image of the whole car taken from the left or right front corner is best.

Use a selection of images that gives buyers a complete view. Save the images together in a folder.

Photos must be:
• JPEG format (or ‘.jpg’)
• S single shot of the car – montage images will be rejected
• With backgrounds – cut outs are unacceptable
• Original photos – library images will be rejected as they’re not a true representation of your vehicle

If you don’t have a digital camera, you can use a scanner to upload your photos.

3. Setting the car price

Setting the car price

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting the right price is vital for a quick sale – too high and you won’t get much interest, too low and you’re giving money away.

There are several ways to set the right price:
• You can get an idea of what your car is worth instantly, based on our analysis of thousands of similar cars for sale
• Search Auto Trader for cars of the same age, condition, mileage and those with similar extras or we can set it up for you

There are many things that affect a car’s value, including:
• Make and model
• Age
• Mileage
• Equipment, such as air-conditioning and alloy wheels
• Overall condition
• Colour
• Rarity of model

Remember, dealers price their cars higher as they need to cover their costs and make a profit. Private sellers don’t  have the same overheads, so make sure you price yours in-line with other private sellers.

The key is to price your car just above what you expect to receive, leaving room to haggle – everyone likes to think they’re getting a bargain.

Think about where you want your advert to appear in the search listings. Setting your price at, say, £995 means your advert is unlikely to appear top in the listing of cars for £1,000 and under.

Take into account the price segments but be realistic and don’t overinflate your price – potential buyers will lose interest.

Top tips:

• Get a car valuation to find out its market value
• Compare your car by looking at the price other people are asking for similarly equipped cars on Auto Trader
• Car price guides can give you an indication of your car’s value
• Visit a dealer to get an idea of your car’s trade-in value – anything you get over this will be a bonus

4. Writing a car advert

Writing a car advert

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you’ve worked out the right price for your car, turn your attention to wording your advert to provide potential buyers with all the information they’ll need, making your sale as quick and smooth as possible.

Enter your car’s details

By entering your car’s registration number, Auto Trader can automatically fill in vital information such as:
• Make and model
• Age
• Body type
• Colour
• Transmission
• Fuel type

Creating your advert

Auto Trader will give you the basic details of your car, but you’ll need to enter the mileage and any optional, interesting or desirable features it has.

Enter the description you want to appear on your advert in the box. Be as clear as possible but try to avoid jargon: ‘metallic red’ is more helpful than ‘Fire Opal’.

Make sure you include:

• How long the road tax has to run
• How long the MOT is valid for
• Whether the car has a full or partial service history – this can add hundreds to the price of a car
• Number of owners – cars with fewer owners are generally more desirable
• Extras like air conditioning, sat-nav, alloy wheels, electric windows and leather seats are all desirable
• Modifications, but be aware some can reduce your car’s value
• Reason for sale – are you buying a new car or moving abroad? Reassure the buyer

Remember that if your car isn’t in great condition, be honest. Otherwise you risk wasting your time and that of potential buyers.

Keep the advert as concise as possible and only include essential information. It’s best to stick to around 50 to 75 words for an online advert or 20 to 30 words in print; the exact length depends on the kind of advert you want.

Avoid:

• Using block capitals as it makes the advert harder to read
• Vague terms and clichéd phrases, such as ‘excellent condition’, ‘lovely driver’ or ‘first to see will buy’

5. Dealing with buyers

Dealing with buyers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling a car privately can be daunting but knowing what to expect and how to deal with buyers helps you avoid running into any problems.

The golden rules of dealing with buyers are:
• Never let a buyer test drive your car alone
• Make sure they have a valid driving licence and suitable insurance cover, or you could be liable for any accidents
• Ask a close friend or relative to be with you
• Keep hold of the car keys at all times and never leave the buyer in the car with the keys
• Let buyers follow their own route, as many are suspicious if you dictate which roads to take
• Don’t be afraid to ask them to slow down or stop – it’s still your car

Inspections

Make sure you’ve prepared your car for sale:
• Allow the buyer to take their time and view the car properly
• Avoid distracting the buyer from carrying out their own checks
• Most buyers will want to start the car when the engine is cold, so try not to drive the car shortly before a viewing

Used car inspections are very popular. The buyer will pay the cost and, if you’re serious about selling the car, you shouldn’t have any objections.

Haggling

Buyers will be keen to haggle on your asking price. You need to be firm, without being unreasonable.

Decide the lowest price you’re willing to sell the car before you begin negotiations. Don’t decline a sale if a buyer’s highest offer is only slightly below your set price – it could cost you far more in re-advertising fees, time and hassle.

Payment

The best way to take payment is in cash and at a bank, so you can pay the money straight into your account and the cashier can check for fake notes:
• Ask to be paid in cash – this is the safest method of payment
• If you receive payment by cheque or electronic transfer, keep possesion of the car until the funds transfer
• Ask the buyer for ID with an address and landline telephone number

 

6. Closing the deal

Closing the deal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Car buyers usually expect some negotiation on price and there are a number of ways to pay. We show you how to seal the deal quickly, for the price you want.

Hagglers

Buyers will be keen to haggle on your asking price. You need to be firm, without being unreasonable.

Decide the lowest price you’re willing to sell the car for before you begin negotiations. A CAP Auto Trader valuation will help. Don’t decline a sale if a buyer’s highest offer is only slightly below your set price – it could cost you far more in re-advertising fees, time and hassle.

Here are some golden rules to haggling:

• Stay calm
• Have your lowest price in mind before the seller arrives
• Indicate you could be open to offers if you’re asked on the phone, but don’t enter negotiations until the buyer has seen the car – you could be haggled down more than you want
• Don’t accept the first offer
• Push the buyer hard but once you’ve given them your negotiating price, stay quiet
• A tank of fuel or extra tax can make a good bargaining tool

Payment

The best way to accept payment is in cash at a bank, allowing you to pay the money straight into your account and letting the cashier check for fake notes. If the buyer gives you cash outside of banking hours, keep it in a safe place and pay it in as soon as possible, keeping posession of the car until it’s in your account.

If the buyer gives you a bank or personal cheque, ask the bank if you can draw funds against the cheque – merely asking if the cheque has cleared can mean something different.

Top tips:

• Ask to be paid in cash – this is the safest method of payment for smaller sums of money
• Payments by cheque will take a few days to reach your account and they can also be cancelled or issued without the available funds in the account
• If you receive payment by electronic transfer, the funds can take a few days to appear in your account
• Ask the buyer for ID with an address and landline telephone number in case of problems
• If possible, go with the buyer to the bank to draw the cheque

Don’t hand over your car until the full amount is in your bank account.

Despite popular belief, bank or building society cheques aren’t as good as cash – forged cheques are common. Find out more about fraudulent payments.

Once you’ve sealed the deal, you’ll need to write a receipt acknowledging the following information:
• The date
• Price
• Make and model
• Registration number
• The names and addresses of the buyer and seller

Make two copies – one for you and one for the buyer – and make sure all parties sign both receipts.

7. Doing the paperwork

Doing the paperwork

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you’ve sealed the deal, you’ll need to write a receipt acknowledging the following information:

• The date
• Price
• Make and model
• Registration number
• The names and addresses of the buyer and seller

Make two copies – one for you and one for the buyer – and make sure all parties sign both receipts.

Complete the tear-off portion at the bottom of the V5C registration document (logbook) and send it to the DVLA. Give the top part of the V5C to the new owner.

Informing the DVLA means you won’t be liable for any fines racked up after the sale.

Hand over the car’s handbook, service log, MOT certificate (if the car is over three years old) and any documents relating the car’s warranty, if it still has one.

Inform your insurance company and return the tax disc to the DVLA for a refund (unless it’s part of the deal).